Coffee cup. Teacup. Trophy cup. There are all kinds of cups! Let’s take a look at

Coffee cup. Teacup. Trophy cup. There are all kinds of cups! Let’s take a look at five cool cups that you can 3D print! In no time, you will be drinking in the satisfaction of making your own vessel for refreshments. A 3D printed cup is an intriguing concept. Instead of 3D printing robot parts, aerospace prototypes, or even 3DBenchies, you can bring the usefulness of in-house additive manufacturing into the kitchen! Before we dive into some great 3D printed cup models, let’s take a look at three criteria any practical dishes should exhibit: What is it? What better way to start the day than with a nice distorted cup of coffee? The designer of this first model definitely recognized this and has published a beautiful 3D printable coffee cup to hold your delectable breakfast beverage! Love espresso? Duplicate3D has also designed a similar Espresso Cup for a bright morning “wake-me-up.” (Don’t worry if you prefer tea time — this model is also compatible with tea!) In about 3-5 hours of print time, you can have your very own crushed coffee cup. Maybe the look of your 3D printed cup will rival the taste of its contents. Who printed it? Nine Thingiverse users have printed this mod...

Want to add some Portuguese pizzaz to your home decor? Instructables user “wentworthm” shows us how

Want to add some Portuguese pizzaz to your home decor? Instructables user “wentworthm” shows us how to design and create some intricate Azulejo tiles using your 3D printer. One of the greatest joys that come with being a 3D printer owner is watching your own idea become actualized right before your very eyes. When a concept comes to mind, a maker can simply hop onto their 3D design software of choice and bring their prototype or product to life straight through the extruder. After traveling with his wife in Portugal, a software engineer and Instructables user who goes by the username of wentworthm became captivated by the country’s traditional Azulejo tiles. Commonly found in both Portugal and Spain, these painted tin-glazed ceramic tilework are used to decorate and also help control the temperature of indoor homes. Inspired by the intricate and vibrant designs, the couple set off to try and integrate these tiles into their own housing projects. However, they struggled to find a design that they both loved and was available in smaller quantities, eventually leading wentworthm to tinker around with his 3D printer until he came up with a solution. The results that wer...